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Messages - Jazz

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1
Books / 2018 Reading List?
« on: January 01, 2018, 03:37:10 PM »
This is honestly the thread that keeps pulling me to GO at this point.  =)  Off to a fast start.

1) Poems from the Book of Hours by Rainer Maria Rilke   I have been meaning to read Rilke for some time, and the local library has a handful.  These are very God centric, but it is a short collection, and I enjoyed the relationships he explores here.

2) The Courage to Create by Rollo May  Published in 1975, this was recommended by my favorite jazz drummer following a performance about 10 days ago.  A psychological examination of the creative process.  Really interesting to see how it jives with some of the observations of my art faculty on how students are so unproductively engaged in electronics now, that they often aren't quieting their mind and being open to a creative process as much.  Truly fascinating read.

Half way through a couple others already.  Hoping to get back to 52 this year.

1) Poems from the Book of Hours by Rainer Maria Rilke
2) The Courage to Create by Rollo May

2
Movies & TV / Re: Last Jedi thoughts with spoilers
« on: December 28, 2017, 03:56:35 PM »
As for the ship going into hyperspace to destroy everything I was pretty upset at that.  Are you trying to tell me that if that worked why wouldn't it have been the defacto way of blowing shit up?  Line up three hammer head cruisers and hyperspace right into the death star.  You just automate that thing and no need to waste life of the pilots.  Hell just build big ass spears with a hyperdrive on it.

This is one of the few bones of contention I have with the movie and for exactly the same reasons as you. Indeed, given the way things work moving at relativistic speeds work, you could theoretically destroy a Death Star by flying a Y-wing into it.

And here's the thing. Before the Crusier goes to lightspeed, the Force Order twig what she's about to do and they are aware of the potential consequences of that. Which means there is a precedent for this sort of action and probably a reason why it isn't normally used.

However, for the life of me I can't think of a reason that's stands up to scrutiny. It can't be because it was "too heinous" a thing to do, given the Force Order and Empire created planet destroying weapons. Indeed, given ethics and morals aren't a consideration, just getting clone pilots to fly ships at lightspeed into planets is probably a more effective way of destroying planets than building a giant frikkin space station.

So my guess is that there is a technical reason. What that might be, I do not know.

And likewise, why didn't the Falcon tear a hole in the side of Han and Chewie's freighter in Ep 7, kicking the pirates into vacuum?

3
Books / Re: 2017 reading list
« on: December 28, 2017, 03:49:34 PM »
36)  Rama II by Arthur C Clarke and Gentry Lee   A second Rama spacecraft approaches.  How will Earth respond?  The book gets bogged down in the first 160 pages with character development that is later unresolved, but the last 260 flies off the page.

1) Star Wars: Bloodline by Claudia Gray
2) Star Wars: A New Dawn by John Jackson Miller
3) Star Wars: Heir to the Jedi by Kevin Hearne
4) Grunt by Mary Roach
5) Red Star Rogue by Kenneth Sewell and Clint Richmond
6) Being a Beast by Charles Foster
7) Neuromancer by William Gibson
8) American Gods by Neil Gaiman
9) Rendezvous with Rama by Arthur C Clarke
10) The STEM Leader Guide- Practical Advice for Creating a STEM School by Hans Meeder
11) Hyperion by Dan Simmons
12) The Universe Within by Neil Shubin
13) The Sea Wolf by Jack London
13) Eaarth by Bill McKibben
14) Oil and Honey by Bill McKibben
15) Grace Without God by Katherine Ozment
16) The Death and Life of the Great Lakes by Dan Egan
17) Harness the Sun by Philip Warburg
18) SW: Aftermath: Empire's End by Chuck Wendig
19) SW: Thrawn by Timothy Zahn
20) The Moon is a Harsh Mistress by Robert A Heinlein
21)  The Radium Girls by Kate Moore
22) A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway
23) SW: Rebel Rising by Beth Revis
24) Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card
25) Watchmen by Alan Moore
26) Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
27) Reimagining the Science Department by Wayne Melville, Doug Jones and Todd Campbell
28) Man's Search for Meaning by Victor Frankl
29) The Princess Bride by William Goldman
30) Colonel Roosevelt by Edmund Morris
31) Darth Vader and the Ghost Prison by Haden Blackman
32) Vader Down by Jason Aaron and Keiron Gillen
33) Darth Vader- The Shu-Torin War by Keiron Gillen
32) The Empire, Legends Vol 1 by Various
33) Kanan, the last Padawan by Greg Weisman
34) Phasma by Delilah S. Dawson
35)  Caesar's Last Breath by Sam Kean
36)  Rama II by Arthur C Clarke and Gentry Lee

4
The Argument Chamber / Re: Zimbabwe and Mugabe
« on: November 27, 2017, 03:57:31 PM »
An artist friend posted this on FB, and I found it to be interesting.

Quote
Robert Mugabe was initially a good revolutionary and leader but he eventually became corrupted by power. Absolute power eventually becomes obsolete power. Mugabe made some serious mistakes, as it relates to the way he approached reallocation of land to the disenfranchised Africans, and how he treated the white population/non-Black African populations of Zimbabwe. I firmly believe in the redistribution of land to the indigenous Africans, however, that task must be done with visionary thinking skills, and justice at its foundation. Two wrongs can never make one right!

Mugabe got lost along the way, he started out doing good and wound up doing WELL for him, his colleague, and clique, which is more than disappointing, it is dismaying and a through back to the very powers that he and the people of Zimbabwe opposed and fought ardently to depose. There is nothing that Mugabe could do in another term that he had not done in forty years of rule, and then he had the gall to try and shoe in his very corrupt wife as the new leader of Zimbabwe, simply reprehensible! Mugabe should have stepped down a long, long time ago with dignity rather than in disgrace.
Want all lose all!

Robert Mugabe reminds me of François Duvalier, also known as "Papa Doc" of Haiti. Both were fabulous visionaries that grew massive and impenetrable mental, ideological, philosophical, and character cataracts! When the leaders have no vision the people suffer and die, and the people must install new leaders with short-term limits, and with vigilant and diligent oversights on the part of the people!

Whoever takes over from Mugabe has to be strong, incorruptible and stealthy. Remember that the so-called advanced nations and their cooperations don't really want to see/have a progressive and righteous African leader, a leader that has the interest of their people and Africa at heart because that will mean an end to unfair access to their/Africa's natural resources. Remember what happened to Patrice Lumumba and other progressives? "The Red Scare," and "Red Baiting" was used as justification for murdering them in their own countries!

5
Books / Re: 2017 reading list
« on: November 04, 2017, 11:31:26 AM »
A bunch of titles, and not sure how I feel about counting the graphic novels as stand alone books.  Meh, they're published separate, so be it.

30) Colonel Roosevelt by Edmund Morris  Finally completed the trilogy.  Morris is a gifted writer who helps you understand the times as well as the man.  The machinations in the Republican Party that led Roosevelt to found the Bull Moose party make the current news about the Democratic primary seem like child's play.  The force that was Teddy Roosevelt is in evidence throughout, including how he wielded his influence as a former president against a sitting president whom he completely disagreed with.  The larger historical context about the run up to WWI was fascinating.  In school it was "Archduke shot, Europe in Chaos, Lusitania sunk, US to the rescue."  No mention of the fact that it was over a year between the Lusitania and US entering, the concerns over Russia flipping sides with the Bolshevik revolution, or Japan using the opportunity to land grab.  Truly magnificent series.

31) Darth Vader and the Ghost Prison by Haden Blackman
32) Vader Down by Jason Aaron and Keiron Gillen
33) Darth Vader- The Shu-Torin War by Keiron Gillen
32) The Empire, Legends Vol 1 by Various
33) Kanan, the last Padawan by Greg Weisman    Here are the graphic novels.  I had heard from a friend there was some good stuff here.  Indeed, it was entertaining as hell to see Vader's power grow.  In one scene in Vader down he is surrounded by over a thousand rebel soldiers, advised to surrender, and responds "All I am surrounded by is fear.....and dead men." as he ignites his lightsaber.  I may read some more as they are fun, fast reads, and the artwork is excellent.  I don't know that I would ever read a graphic novel when a regular version is available, but as standalones, they were a blast.

34) Phasma by Delilah S. Dawson  Another new novel, told via flashbacks to Phasma's origins.  Perhaps not the greatest of the new books, but entertaining nonetheless and helps fill in how the First Order functions.

EDIT:  35)  Caesar's Last Breath by Sam Kean    IMHO, Kean is the best popular writer on science topics.  Fantastic accounting of how gases behave, the evolution of our atmosphere, and what it means for daily living.  The title premise is that in every breath, we likely inhale a molecule or two that Caesar exhaled in his last breath.  Stunning writing, combined with attempts to make the huge numbers understandable

1) Star Wars: Bloodline by Claudia Gray
2) Star Wars: A New Dawn by John Jackson Miller
3) Star Wars: Heir to the Jedi by Kevin Hearne
4) Grunt by Mary Roach
5) Red Star Rogue by Kenneth Sewell and Clint Richmond
6) Being a Beast by Charles Foster
7) Neuromancer by William Gibson
8) American Gods by Neil Gaiman
9) Rendezvous with Rama by Arthur C Clarke
10) The STEM Leader Guide- Practical Advice for Creating a STEM School by Hans Meeder
11) Hyperion by Dan Simmons
12) The Universe Within by Neil Shubin
13) The Sea Wolf by Jack London
13) Eaarth by Bill McKibben
14) Oil and Honey by Bill McKibben
15) Grace Without God by Katherine Ozment
16) The Death and Life of the Great Lakes by Dan Egan
17) Harness the Sun by Philip Warburg
18) SW: Aftermath: Empire's End by Chuck Wendig
19) SW: Thrawn by Timothy Zahn
20) The Moon is a Harsh Mistress by Robert A Heinlein
21)  The Radium Girls by Kate Moore
22) A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway
23) SW: Rebel Rising by Beth Revis
24) Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card
25) Watchmen by Alan Moore
26) Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
27) Reimagining the Science Department by Wayne Melville, Doug Jones and Todd Campbell
28) Man's Search for Meaning by Victor Frankl
29) The Princess Bride by William Goldman
30) Colonel Roosevelt by Edmund Morris
31) Darth Vader and the Ghost Prison by Haden Blackman
32) Vader Down by Jason Aaron and Keiron Gillen
33) Darth Vader- The Shu-Torin War by Keiron Gillen
32) The Empire, Legends Vol 1 by Various
33) Kanan, the last Padawan by Greg Weisman
34) Phasma by Delilah S. Dawson
35)  Caesar's Last Breath by Sam Kean

6
Sports / Re: NFL 2017-2018
« on: October 02, 2017, 07:23:54 PM »
Bears going to the rookie QB which fans have been clamoring for, only to forget their clamoring and criticize why he was playing in a wasted season when he gets hurt in two weeks.

7
The Argument Chamber / Re: Kneeling to the flag
« on: October 02, 2017, 07:22:03 PM »
http://www.snopes.com/veteran-kaepernick-take-a-knee-anthem/

When a veteran advised him to take a knee instead of sit, the righteous indignation should die down a bit.  But Nationalism rears an ugly, fact-ignoring face many a times.

8
Books / Re: 2017 reading list
« on: September 04, 2017, 12:50:46 PM »
29) The Princess Bride by William Goldman  If you love the movie, and have never read the book, do yourself a favor and get it sometime.  Absolutely delightful with a twin narrative of the story line and author talk.  I actually giggled out loud numerous times while reading.

1) Star Wars: Bloodline by Claudia Gray
2) Star Wars: A New Dawn by John Jackson Miller
3) Star Wars: Heir to the Jedi by Kevin Hearne
4) Grunt by Mary Roach
5) Red Star Rogue by Kenneth Sewell and Clint Richmond
6) Being a Beast by Charles Foster
7) Neuromancer by William Gibson
8) American Gods by Neil Gaiman
9) Rendezvous with Rama by Arthur C Clarke
10) The STEM Leader Guide- Practical Advice for Creating a STEM School by Hans Meeder
11) Hyperion by Dan Simmons
12) The Universe Within by Neil Shubin
13) The Sea Wolf by Jack London
13) Eaarth by Bill McKibben
14) Oil and Honey by Bill McKibben
15) Grace Without God by Katherine Ozment
16) The Death and Life of the Great Lakes by Dan Egan
17) Harness the Sun by Philip Warburg
18) SW: Aftermath: Empire's End by Chuck Wendig
19) SW: Thrawn by Timothy Zahn
20) The Moon is a Harsh Mistress by Robert A Heinlein
21)  The Radium Girls by Kate Moore
22) A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway
23) SW: Rebel Rising by Beth Revis
24) Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card
25) Watchmen by Alan Moore
26) Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
27) Reimagining the Science Department by Wayne Melville, Doug Jones and Todd Campbell
28) Man's Search for Meaning by Victor Frankl
29) The Princess Bride by William Goldman

9
Books / Re: 2017 reading list
« on: August 26, 2017, 08:03:26 PM »
27) Reimagining the Science Department by Wayne Melville, Doug Jones and Todd Campbell    A coworker put forth the thought that we are completely unproductive from 3-4, so it has become the professional reading time.  This is the first fruit of that set aside.  Really helpful and practical book that has made me feel much better about the work I am doing now as an administrator.

28) Man's Search for Meaning by Victor Frankl  Suggested by my counselor.  The first 100 pages of 154 are a recollection of the author's time in various concentration camps.  Incredibly moving.  The final 54 are his synopsis of logotherapy, which he is the father of.  The basic tenet is that meaning is different for each individual, but can be found via action in the world, by experiencing something or encountering someone, and our attitude towards unavoidable suffering.  Incredibly thoughtful and a good way for me as a non-religious person to center myself when struggling.

1) Star Wars: Bloodline by Claudia Gray
2) Star Wars: A New Dawn by John Jackson Miller
3) Star Wars: Heir to the Jedi by Kevin Hearne
4) Grunt by Mary Roach
5) Red Star Rogue by Kenneth Sewell and Clint Richmond
6) Being a Beast by Charles Foster
7) Neuromancer by William Gibson
8) American Gods by Neil Gaiman
9) Rendezvous with Rama by Arthur C Clarke
10) The STEM Leader Guide- Practical Advice for Creating a STEM School by Hans Meeder
11) Hyperion by Dan Simmons
12) The Universe Within by Neil Shubin
13) The Sea Wolf by Jack London
13) Eaarth by Bill McKibben
14) Oil and Honey by Bill McKibben
15) Grace Without God by Katherine Ozment
16) The Death and Life of the Great Lakes by Dan Egan
17) Harness the Sun by Philip Warburg
18) SW: Aftermath: Empire's End by Chuck Wendig
19) SW: Thrawn by Timothy Zahn
20) The Moon is a Harsh Mistress by Robert A Heinlein
21)  The Radium Girls by Kate Moore
22) A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway
23) SW: Rebel Rising by Beth Revis
24) Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card
25) Watchmen by Alan Moore
26) Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
27) Reimagining the Science Department by Wayne Melville, Doug Jones and Todd Campbell
28) Man's Search for Meaning by Victor Frankl

10
Books / Re: 2017 reading list
« on: August 20, 2017, 02:26:17 PM »
25) Watchmen by Alan Moore   Felt just like the movie, which is good for the movie.  First ever graphic novel, and not certain I like the medium.

26) Frankenstein by Mary Shelley  Nothing like I expected.  The prose is lush, the monster is amazing, and the moral crises are phenomenal.  One of the best books of the year.

1) Star Wars: Bloodline by Claudia Gray
2) Star Wars: A New Dawn by John Jackson Miller
3) Star Wars: Heir to the Jedi by Kevin Hearne
4) Grunt by Mary Roach
5) Red Star Rogue by Kenneth Sewell and Clint Richmond
6) Being a Beast by Charles Foster
7) Neuromancer by William Gibson
8) American Gods by Neil Gaiman
9) Rendezvous with Rama by Arthur C Clarke
10) The STEM Leader Guide- Practical Advice for Creating a STEM School by Hans Meeder
11) Hyperion by Dan Simmons
12) The Universe Within by Neil Shubin
13) The Sea Wolf by Jack London
13) Eaarth by Bill McKibben
14) Oil and Honey by Bill McKibben
15) Grace Without God by Katherine Ozment
16) The Death and Life of the Great Lakes by Dan Egan
17) Harness the Sun by Philip Warburg
18) SW: Aftermath: Empire's End by Chuck Wendig
19) SW: Thrawn by Timothy Zahn
20) The Moon is a Harsh Mistress by Robert A Heinlein
21)  The Radium Girls by Kate Moore
22) A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway
23) SW: Rebel Rising by Beth Revis
24) Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card
25) Watchmen by Alan Moore
26) Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

11
Books / Re: 2017 reading list
« on: July 31, 2017, 12:22:56 PM »
Needed some new blood after Hemingway.  I had bookmarked this list from NPR years ago and decided to make some headway.  I was at 31 of 100, so decided to request the top five I haven't read from the local library system.  Went in to get them, and browsed for a few more quick reads.

23) SW: Rebel Rising by Beth Revis   The story of Jyn Erso.  Superfast read (400 pgs in under 6 hours)  Get to see her relationship with Saw and his decline, and her entanglements with both the rebels and the Empire.  Not bad.

24) Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card  I had wanted to read this before the movie came out, and never did.  Gives me a greater appreciation of both.  The film had to prize battles over introspection and characters, but the book does the opposite.  Going to request the next two in the series after I'm done with this batch.

Up next: Mary Shelly's Frankenstein.

1) Star Wars: Bloodline by Claudia Gray
2) Star Wars: A New Dawn by John Jackson Miller
3) Star Wars: Heir to the Jedi by Kevin Hearne
4) Grunt by Mary Roach
5) Red Star Rogue by Kenneth Sewell and Clint Richmond
6) Being a Beast by Charles Foster
7) Neuromancer by William Gibson
8) American Gods by Neil Gaiman
9) Rendezvous with Rama by Arthur C Clarke
10) The STEM Leader Guide- Practical Advice for Creating a STEM School by Hans Meeder
11) Hyperion by Dan Simmons
12) The Universe Within by Neil Shubin
13) The Sea Wolf by Jack London
13) Eaarth by Bill McKibben
14) Oil and Honey by Bill McKibben
15) Grace Without God by Katherine Ozment
16) The Death and Life of the Great Lakes by Dan Egan
17) Harness the Sun by Philip Warburg
18) SW: Aftermath: Empire's End by Chuck Wendig
19) SW: Thrawn by Timothy Zahn
20) The Moon is a Harsh Mistress by Robert A Heinlein
21)  The Radium Girls by Kate Moore
22) A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway
23) SW: Rebel Rising by Beth Revis
24) Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card

12
Movies & TV / Re: What are you watching?
« on: July 25, 2017, 02:22:11 PM »
Saw Valerian.  Visually delightful.  Lead characters are not great.  Fails the Bechdel test miserably.

13
Books / Re: 2017 reading list
« on: July 25, 2017, 02:21:15 PM »
22) A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway  Took 5 weeks to read 400 pages.  I really enjoyed Old Man and the Sea, and wanted to try another Hemingway.  I flew through the first 120 pages...and then the style just overwhelmed me.  Very staccato- short sentences, punchy formatting.  It just overwhelmed me.  So I took a break and returned.  Finally pushed through to the end.  The machismo and flat female characters are hallmarks of his, but this was too much for me.  Will have to move on to another author.

1) Star Wars: Bloodline by Claudia Gray
2) Star Wars: A New Dawn by John Jackson Miller
3) Star Wars: Heir to the Jedi by Kevin Hearne
4) Grunt by Mary Roach
5) Red Star Rogue by Kenneth Sewell and Clint Richmond
6) Being a Beast by Charles Foster
7) Neuromancer by William Gibson
8) American Gods by Neil Gaiman
9) Rendezvous with Rama by Arthur C Clarke
10) The STEM Leader Guide- Practical Advice for Creating a STEM School by Hans Meeder
11) Hyperion by Dan Simmons
12) The Universe Within by Neil Shubin
13) The Sea Wolf by Jack London
13) Eaarth by Bill McKibben
14) Oil and Honey by Bill McKibben
15) Grace Without God by Katherine Ozment
16) The Death and Life of the Great Lakes by Dan Egan
17) Harness the Sun by Philip Warburg
18) SW: Aftermath: Empire's End by Chuck Wendig
19) SW: Thrawn by Timothy Zahn
20) The Moon is a Harsh Mistress by Robert A Heinlein
21)  The Radium Girls by Kate Moore
22) A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway

14
Movies & TV / Re: What are you watching?
« on: July 06, 2017, 11:07:04 AM »
History Channel: America's War on Drugs   Highly recommended walkthrough how we made this our own problem and then exacerbated it.

15
Yes.

Thanks for playing!

than there is no meaning in beating the dead horse like you. simply waste of time.

Not true, Pix beats his dead horse often...although it is mainly to waste time, so you were half right.

I also gave Narsica a cookie and am glad that this thread is being preserved.

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